Decision-making during the COVID-19 pandemic


COVID-19 series — installment #2: RIKEN CBS Unit Leader Rei Akaishi talks about government decision-making during the pandemic.

Random movements help color-detecting cells form the proper pattern


Scientists have used a mathematical model to explain why zebrafish cone cells in the eye are arranged in a specific pattern in all individuals.

Boosting betaine may be a treatment for schizophrenia


Supplementing model mice with glycine betaine (trimethylglycine), a compound originally derived from beets, can alleviate symptoms of schizophrenia.

Eve Marder: freeing knowledge, crashing neurons


None of us would get on a plane that had its parts changed in mid-air, says Eve Marder, who has spent her career probing a very specific cluster of crustacean nerve cells. Yet we are all walking around undergoing a constant turnover of cellular parts, and so are the lobsters and crabs Marder studies.

Freedom from fear ?‍♀️


Researchers discover a dopaminergic circuit in the brain that allows fear associations to disappear when there isn’t anything to be afraid of anymore.

RIKEN Research Spring issue is here


Just a quick post to let you know that the Spring issue of RIKEN Research Magazine came out towards the end of March. This issue covers issues including the discovery of element 113, earth-friendly pesticides, and the secrets of a rice-killing fungal toxin. Enjoy!

Follow Us

Topics

Latest research animations

NEW: Opossum hearts hint at new ways of fighting cardiovascular disease

Artificial intelligence improves the diagnosis of congenital heart defects before birth

Full research highlight animation playlist (click the menu icon to see video list) 

Latest Posts

Science communication symposium


Friday I participated in a small symposium that focused on science communication (for institutions in Japan). We discussed using social media as a means to self-publish wow! and amazing! research findings. Here are some of my thoughts about how useful this plays out in Japan.

Opto-OISI: imaging connections in the living brain


A new imaging technique called opto-OISI allows scientists to non-invasively visualize where specific neurons project in the living brain.

A self-powered heart monitor taped to the skin


A group of scientists have developed a human-friendly, ultra-flexible organic sensor powered by sunlight, which acts as a self-powered heart monitor.

Understanding non-coding DNA: gene “enhancers”


NETCAGE is a newly developed technique for determining the structure of portions of the non-coding genome called ‘enhancers.’

Mutations, CRISPR, and spinocerebellar ataxia


Scientists discover that mutations causing the degenerative movement disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 29 work by disrupting calcium release of neurons inside the brain.

Cassava engineered to produce healthier tapioca starch


Reducing the amount of starch branching enzymes in cassava plants made more resistant and thus healthier tapioca starch.

CAPON links Alzheimer’s plaques to neurodegeneration


CAPON was found to link Aβ plaques and hippocampal neurodegeneration in mice, explaining how these two hallmarks of Alzheimer’s disease are related.

Opossums are the first genome edited marsupials


A new piezoelectronic microinjection method has allowed the first successful genome editing in marsupials: albino opossums.

Green hydrogen production for fuel cells and fertilizers


A new method of water electrolysis avoids rare metals, making hydrogen production green and sustainable.

New lab-grown retinal sheets almost ready for clinical trials


A new retinal transplant technique works by preventing bipolar cells from maturing in lab-grown retinal sheets.

Diazoxide pills for Alzheimer’s disease?


Drug therapy with with diazoxide relieved symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease in the brains of mice and improved memory.