Superfly flight simulator helps unravel navigation in the brain


Optical imaging neural activity in flies as they use a flight simulator can help us understand how the brain codes navigation.

Cyborg microchip valve driven by earthworm muscle


This earthworm muscle-controlled biological microelectromechanical system (bio‐MEMS) could lead the way to next-generation medical implants.

Eve Marder: freeing knowledge, crashing neurons


None of us would get on a plane that had its parts changed in mid-air, says Eve Marder, who has spent her career probing a very specific cluster of crustacean nerve cells. Yet we are all walking around undergoing a constant turnover of cellular parts, and so are the lobsters and crabs Marder studies.

Gut bacteria double team worsens symptoms of multiple sclerosis


Joint activity of two gut bacteria leads to excessive MOG-specific T-cell activity and demyelination of neurons in the spinal cord of a mouse model of multiple sclerosis.

New artificial skin helps avoid animal testing


A new artificial skin that reproduces proper tension can be used to research skin function and disease while reducing the need to experiment on animals.

Super-thin wearable electronics just got more flexible


A method for making super-flexible and ultra-thin wearable electronics uses water-vapor plasma to create gold-gold bonds.

Follow Us

Topics

Organ regeneration in the lab


Interview with Takashi Tsuji, team leader of the Laboratory for Organ Regeneration at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology

Gray matter volume links symptoms in autism


Low gray matter volume in the posterior superior parietal lobule (pSPL) was found to correlate with specific cognitive and perceptual symptoms of autism.

Blood cell mutations linked to leukemia are inevitable


Researchers show that blood cell mutations increase with age identify risk factors for developing leukemia in Japanese and European populations.

Protons are lighter than previously thought


A new and most precise measurement of protons shows that they are lighter than previously thought.

Cancer cells killed with artificial glycosylated metalloenzyme


Scientists have developed two cancer therapies that use an artificial glycosylated metalloenzyme to specifically target cancer cells in mice.

Chaos theory provides hints for controlling the weather


Computer simulations were used to show that small adjustments to certain variables in the weather system could modify weather phenomena such as sudden downpours.

New lab-grown retinal sheets almost ready for clinical trials


A new retinal transplant technique works by preventing bipolar cells from maturing in lab-grown retinal sheets.

Social contact-seeking behavior and loneliness in the brain


Levels of the peptide amylin in the brain are related to loneliness; activating amylin neurons in the MPOA drives isolated mice to seek social contact.

Why (mouse) mothers take risks to protect their infants


The calcitonin receptor and its ligand amylin act in the brain to motivate mouse mothers to protect their pups, even in risky/dangerous situations.

New treatment assembles cancer drug inside the body


Cancer drugs assembled inside the body on cancer cells should reduce harmful side effects to other tissue.